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VET military veteran employment
Wells Fargo's Veteran Employment Transition program offers on-the-job experience and learning opportunities for military veterans transitioning to civilian work.

Military veterans receive career support through Wells Fargo’s VET program

The Veteran Employment Transition program offers on-the-job experience and learning opportunities for military veterans transitioning to civilian work.

May 19, 2017
Janey Kiryluik

Military veterans often face challenges during their transition back to civilian life, especially when it comes to finding a career path that is a good fit. It can be tough to learn about organizations and their available jobs, and to determine how military skills transfer to a corporate environment.

Wells Fargo is working to make this transition easier. The company recently introduced the Veteran Employment Transition (VET) program, which offers veterans interested in working for Wells Fargo an internship to help with the transition to civilian life. The program also supports the company’s commitment to employ 20,000 military veterans by 2020.

“During my transition, I was intent on finding a place to learn and grow as quickly as possible, and I knew I wanted to pursue something in investment banking and capital markets,” said Sahm Cho, an analyst with Wells Fargo Securities and former VET participant. “I applied for a few transition programs and ultimately accepted the internship offer from the VET program. I felt that, from the application process through the moment I received the offer, there was a strong goal-oriented and team-driven culture at Wells Fargo.”

The VET program offers military veterans an eight-week internship to gain insights into working for Wells Fargo. Participants have opportunities for networking, mentoring, on-the-job training, developing skills and knowledge of financial products and services, and learning more about the financial services industry.

“I notice my peers sometimes struggle during their transition when there is an inability to reconcile the immediately visible value they added in the military and the work they transition into afterward,” Cho said. “I was very fortunate to work with a group of people who pride themselves on being a team and to feel that I was adding value shortly after I arrived.”

Wells Fargo welcomed 44 veterans in 2017 who are participating in internships across the country, with more expected in 2018.

“Military veterans are a natural source of talent for Wells Fargo. In addition to demonstrating productivity in tough and complex situations, veterans are comfortable working in highly functioning teams made up of people from diverse backgrounds,” said Frank Van Buren, director with Wells Fargo Securities and a VET program rotation manager. “The key to our continued success in the recruitment, development, and retention of high-potential veterans is to share the success stories of our current veterans and continue to gain program support from nonveteran leaders and team members.”

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