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Craig Moore and his wife next to quote: You have to have a willingness to roll with the punches and flexibility, relying on your experience to make decisions and trust that you're doing what's right when there is no precedent. That's the fun stuff.
Craig Moore and his wife next to quote: You have to have a willingness to roll with the punches and flexibility, relying on your experience to make decisions and trust that you're doing what's right when there is no precedent. That's the fun stuff.
Our Point of View
May 13, 2022

Craig Moore: ‘You have to have a willingness to roll with the punches’

A Q&A with Craig Moore, senior legal counsel for Wells Fargo Marketing, Brand, and Advertising.

We sat down with Craig Moore, senior legal counsel for Wells Fargo Marketing, Brand, and Advertising, to learn his favorite part of the job, how he feels about Twitter, what he would be doing if he hadn’t become a lawyer, and more.

Q: What makes Wells Fargo different from your other experiences?

When I graduated from law school I clerked at the Missouri Supreme Court for a year, then I litigated at a large international law firm for 10 years before taking an in-house role at Anheuser Busch. Working in-house at Wells Fargo, which is just “slightly” more conservative than the alcohol beverage company I previously worked at, I am able to bring my experiences to help the marketing team move forward. I say things like, “No, you can actually do that” or “Maybe you can do a couple of other things,” as opposed to trying to pull them back. You wouldn't think that the lawyer on the call is the one saying you could do more.

Q: What made you join Wells Fargo?

This was a new opportunity at a large Fortune 50 company, and it felt like an exciting place to see what was different out there. I was also intrigued by the opportunity to expand my knowledge base and join an internal team that focused on intellectual property, trademark, and copyright. It was a new challenge, and I like taking on a new challenge.

Q: What's your favorite part of the job?

Most people aren't going to think of a bank lawyer’s job as having a lot of variety, but on a given day I can be talking to the social media team, reviewing internal articles and national brand campaigns, doing commercials, consulting with a colleague on trademark use, or reviewing contracts. You never know what is going to happen on a given day, and that’s the fun stuff. There is a lot of variety, and I think that is one of the major positives.

Q: What is one of your favorite projects you have worked on?

One of the very first ad campaigns I worked on was a couple adopting a girl, and they were learning sign language. It was just a beautiful ad, free of the usual 15 disclaimers. I don't know that people go out there wanting to be emotional about their bank. I don't think they do, but when their bank makes them feel emotional, they remember it. That is the marketer in me, not the lawyer, but I think those are the sort of campaigns that are fun to work on.

Q: When you're at a cocktail party, how do you explain your job?

I usually just say that I do a lot of brand advertising and intellectual property work, and somehow people walk away with that remembering, “Craig works on TV commercials,” which isn’t a huge chunk of what I do. But they understand that more than brand legal communications. When I started in the social/digital area, my wife just thought that I played on the internet. I got started on the social media track within law because when social media was growing in popularity, I wanted to be able to prepare my clients. I also try to stay ahead of trends, and right now I’m really into crypto.

Q: What is your interest in cryptocurrency?

When I heard about crypto, I dug into it, and it seemed to be something that could disrupt the financial services industry. I knew that if I was going to work in the legal area at a bank, I should be aware of it as a potential competitor. I fell down a rabbit hole and started learning about it, just so I could speak intelligently if someone came to me discussing crypto. I have read about 25 different books that cover crypto, bitcoin, ethereum, the history of the monetary system and how it fits in there. I really feel like digital currencies are going to disrupt the financial services industry.

Q: If you were not a lawyer, what would you do?

I would be a baseball scout or a bartender.

Q: What's your favorite social network?

Twitter. I was on Twitter before Twitter was cool. It's sort of like walking into a bar and the conversations are just going on, and you just kind of pick up what you want; you don't feel like you've missed anything if you're not there. Twitter is like the internet’s bar. For almost everything, I tend to speak in music, movie, or sports references, and that’s shown on my Twitter account.

Q: Tell us about your career path.

Inexplicably random things have happened to make my career; it was not a straight-line trajectory. Some of the lines didn't make any sense at all! I can't really tell you, “This is what you should do if you want to get here,” but what I would say is just to go follow what interests you, and that's always been what has led me to my next thing.

Q: What is the best piece of advice you received?

A lot of what attorneys do is writing, but I got advice years ago to focus on my own writing and not to edit everything I receive to death. A mentor once told me, “Nothing you’re editing is the Magna Carta.”

Q: Is there anything we haven't covered that you would want people to know?

Our work on the Brand, Intellectual Property, Trademark and Copyright team isn’t always the typical 9-to-5 job. I’ve had internal crisis calls at 9:00 p.m. while on the sidelines of my son's baseball game and other situations that require immediate review and legal approval. I’ve worked on late-night cuts for the NBA finals, early morning Good Morning America clips, and real-time approvals for the Wells Fargo Championship. You have to have a willingness to roll with the punches and flexibility, relying on your experience to make decisions and trust that you’re doing what’s right when there is no precedent. That’s the fun stuff.

We hope you had fun meeting Craig. If you want to join a company where you can work with people like him, check out open opportunities on wellsfargojobs.com. 

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