Environment
February 10, 2015

Bringing more fresh produce to Alaskans’ tables

An agriculture program at Alaska Pacific University is increasing the number of farmers who bring fresh vegetables to residents who need them.

Enjoying fresh produce at dinner can be tough in Alaska, where both weather and distance present challenges to the efficient transportation of food.

Megan Talley of Alaska Pacific University says, “In the face of extreme weather patterns and the distance most food travels to get to us, Alaska has an especially vulnerable food system. One viable way to address that is to increase the number of farms and farmers who bring fresh produce to Alaskans’ tables.”

The university created a community-supported agriculture program to help more people get access to fresh vegetables. Wells Fargo provided the farm with a $50,000 grant through its Environmental Solutions for Communities program. Team members also volunteer at the farm, planting rhubarb and more.

Dana Rogers, Wells Fargo’s community affairs manager in Alaska, says, “This grant is a great example of how we are helping our communities become better stewards of the environment and improving the long-term quality of life.”

The farm, about 45 miles north of Anchorage, was founded by Louise Kellogg, the first woman farmer in the state. It is now part of Alaska Pacific University’s 800-acre Kellogg Campus, which is also known as Spring Creek Farm, in Palmer. The university also hosts an apprenticeship program for aspiring young farmers and Louise’s Farm School for home schooled children.

Volunteers work on a farm.
Wells Fargo provided a $50,000 grant to Alaska Pacific University
Louise Kellogg
Wells Fargo team members Judith Crotty, Erik Amundson, David Kennedy, and Paul Beer volunteer at Spring Creek Farm.
Wells Fargo provided a $50,000 grant to Alaska Pacific University through the Environmental Solutions for Communities program.
The farm was founded by Louise Kellogg, the first woman farmer in Alaska.
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