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A series of images show portions of artists' colorful designs.
Three artists contributed to the Mi Cultura Gallery in Wells Fargo’s Card Design Studio®, the latest in a series of collections that help celebrate diversity, culture, and community.
A series of images show portions of artists' colorful designs.
Three artists contributed to the Mi Cultura Gallery in Wells Fargo’s Card Design Studio®, the latest in a series of collections that help celebrate diversity, culture, and community.
Diversity & Inclusion
October 15, 2021

Expressions of Mi Cultura

Artists from the global Latino community contributed works for the latest debit cards available through Wells Fargo’s Card Design Studio®.

A banner reads 'Hispanic Heritage Month - Celebrating the cultures and achievements of Hispanic and Latino American communities

Three artists were asked to explore an enormous theme — representing what is universal yet distinctive about Latino cultures worldwide — all on a wallet-sized canvas. Their creations are now being showcased on debit cards in the Wells Fargo Card Design Studio® Mi Cultura Gallery.

“We imagined these as a canvas in your wallet that people would be proud to flash out when they use them,” said Monica Marulanda, executive creative director for Alma, an award-winning ad agency with a multinational staff that helped lead the project.

“We wanted to tell a story through imagery that talked about strengths, pride, heritage, the past, the future … we also considered the range of territories that represent us as a people, and there was so much story to tell. That is how we started the endeavor of finding the artists who would help us tell this story beautifully.”

The cards, available to customers with eligible debit cards, feature dynamic and stylized interpretations of the spirit of determination, a festive musicality, and the enduring beauty found in iconic flora and fauna. The Mi Cultura Gallery was also featured in a video on Univision.

A picture of a person is next to a yellow rectangular box with the word Juanco

The art of Juanco featured in the Mi Cultura Gallery centers elements of history in visual language that feels very ‘now,’ to help represent the concept of heritage.

Juanco, based in Peru, interpreted design elements that reflect pre-Columbian influences on the cultures of American continents — such as Aztec and Mayan, Mochica, Chavin, and Inca — noting their lasting resonance.

He noted that the iconography of Chachapoya and Wari cultures, in particular, have left an impression on him since childhood.

“His work is a representation of what came to mind when we talked about the past and our heritage, and how it is timeless,” said Marulanda, referencing herself and her team, which includes dozens of nationalities.

 An animation shows closeups of artwork before panning out to show the art on a debit card.
An illustration of a person wearing an elaborate headdress
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A picture of a person next to a yellow box with the words Cristobal Ojeda Newfren

Mixing the playful and the dynamic, the artist Cristobal Ojeda Newfren presents images focused on musicality for the Mi Cultura Gallery. To bring a celebratory sense of movement and vitality to his artwork, he incorporated stylistic cues from cartoon imagery prevalent in urban Latin America and Mexico.

“The other exploration we thought about was the present: what we are going through right now as Latino people. How do we showcase what moves us?” said Marulanda. “We all hear in our music our roots and elements that are now blending into many cultures.”

The designer and illustrator’s work may look familiar, as he has also contributed works for other brands around the world, including Nike and Chevrolet.

 An animation shows closeups of music-themed artwork before panning out to show the art on a debit card.
Hear artist's description of their process (in Spanish)
A music-themed illustration
Click to expand
A photo of a person is next to a yellow rectangular box with the words Erika Zeledon

Costa Rican illustrator and graphic designer Erika Zeledon presents careful explorations of nature infused with meaning. Using color, spacing, and knowledge of history, her birds and flowers animate the concept of strength, capture the elemental, and even honor creation.

With the quetzal, a bird that is important in Latin American culture — it was sacred to the ancient Mayans and Aztecs and is Guatemala’s national emblem — Zeledon conveys a quiet strength, positioning the bird around representative plants of Latin America in one of her pieces for the collection. In another piece, she has chosen the high-flying macaw, known for its associations with the heat of the sun and the expansiveness of the sky, juxtaposed with tropical plants. 

“Any of us can look up at the sky, and be reminded of home, sometimes seeing migratory birds and being filled with wonder about how they got there,” said Marulanda. “Besides choosing these works because of the wonderful use of color and lines, and knowing they would look good, they help us boil down these big concepts onto small canvases you take in your pocket.”

 An animation shows closeups of bird-themed artwork before panning out to show the art on a debit card.
Hear artist's description of their process (in Spanish)
A colorful illustration of birds and flowers
Click to expand

Explore our card designs that help celebrate diversity, culture, and community

A series of five debit cards, each with artistic designs

View the gallery at wellsfargo.com/micultura and customize your eligible debit card(s) with a design from the Mi Cultura Gallery.

A banner reads 'Explore more Hispanic Heritage Month stories on Wells Fargo Stories'

Investment and Insurance Products are:

▸ Not Insured by the FDIC or Any Federal Government Agency

▸ Not a Deposit or Other Obligation of, or Guaranteed by, the Bank or Any Bank Affiliate

▸ Subject to Investment Risks, Including Possible Loss of the Principal Amount Invested

Deposit products offered by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Member FDIC.

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